Connect with us

World Cup

All Blacks hooker Dane Coles re-signs with New Zealand Rugby, Hurricanes until 2023

Published

on

Dane Coles will remain with the Hurricanes and All Blacks until the end of 2023.

Grant Down/Photosport

Dane Coles will remain with the Hurricanes and All Blacks until the end of 2023.

The embattled Hurricanes received some good news as New Zealand Rugby confirmed the signature of combative hooker Dane Coles until the end of 2023.

NZR announced Coles’ re-signing on Monday, until the end of the 2023 Rugby World Cup in France. He will also remain with the Hurricanes who he debuted for in 2009.

The 34-year-old was rested from the early rounds of Super Rugby Aotearoa with a calf niggle but showed in recent weeks his form is as strong as ever.

SKY SPORT

A late penalty pushed the Chiefs over the line against the Crusaders.

He was an imposing presence in the Hurricanes’ 30-27 golden point loss to the Crusaders and hooking rival Codie Taylor, as the Wellington side remained anchored to the foot of the ladder with a 1-5 record.

READ MORE:
* Super Rugby Aotearoa: Dane Coles calls for honesty in what’s gone wrong at Hurricanes
* Super Rugby Aotearoa: ‘We can sulk, or get on with it’: Where to now for luckless Hurricanes?
* Super Rugby Aotearoa: Crusaders sink Hurricanes in another golden point thriller

Coles’ re-signing signals the first of the Hurricanes’ Big Five to recommit past this season.

Captain Ardie Savea and Ngani Laumape are off contract after this year, while Jordie Barrett is with NZR until the end of next year but has an option in his contract to join another Super Rugby club.

Then there’s halfback TJ Perenara, currently playing in Japan and being strongly linked to a switch to the National Rugby League with the Sydney Roosters confirming their interest in recent days.

Dane Coles will look to extend his 74-test career for the All Blacks.

Jason McCawley/Getty Images

Dane Coles will look to extend his 74-test career for the All Blacks.

Said Coles, who has 74 test appearances and more than 120 matches for the Hurricanes: “I’m so grateful to be playing the game I love, and grateful for the opportunity to continue with the Hurricanes and New Zealand Rugby.

“The Hurricanes have been loyal to me, I’m a ‘one club’ man, so to continue my career with them will be awesome.“I’m also looking forward to giving myself a chance to again play for the All Blacks. It’s a huge honour to play for that team and I never take my opportunities in the black jersey for granted.”

MORE TO FOLLOW

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

World Cup

Yokohama experience negates any doubts over Bok readiness

Published

on





















Yokohama experience negates any doubts over Bok readiness | SuperSport – Africa’s source of sports video, fixtures, results and news






{“slug”:”rugby”,”name”:”Rugby”,”menu”:[],”topics”:[{“group_name”:”South Africa”,”topics”:[{“name”:”Super Rugby Unlocked”,”slug”:”super-rugby-unlocked”,”parent_slug”:”super-rugby-unlocked”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Kick Off”,”slug”:”kick-off”,”parent_slug”:”kick-off”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[“logs”]},{“name”:”Rainbow Cup SA”,”slug”:”rainbow-cup-sa”,”parent_slug”:”rainbow-cup-sa”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Springboks”,”slug”:”springboks”,”parent_slug”:”springboks”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[“logs”]},{“name”:”Chasing the Sun”,”slug”:”chasing-the-sun”,”parent_slug”:”chasing-the-sun”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[“results”,”fixtures”,”logs”]},{“name”:”Carling Currie Cup”,”slug”:”currie-cup”,”parent_slug”:”currie-cup”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Varsity Cup”,”slug”:”varsity-cup”,”parent_slug”:”varsity-cup”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]}]},{“group_name”:”Europe”,”topics”:[{“name”:”B&I Lions”,”slug”:”british-lions”,”parent_slug”:”british-lions”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Pro14″,”slug”:”pro14″,”parent_slug”:”pro14″,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Top 14″,”slug”:”top14″,”parent_slug”:”top14″,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Champions Cup”,”slug”:”champions-cup”,”parent_slug”:”champions-cup”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Gallagher Premiership”,”slug”:”england”,”parent_slug”:”england”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]}]},{“group_name”:”International”,”topics”:[{“name”:”Tri Nations”,”slug”:”tri-nations”,”parent_slug”:”tri-nations”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Rainbow Cup”,”slug”:”rainbow-cup”,”parent_slug”:”rainbow-cup”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Super Rugby Trans Tasman”,”slug”:”super-rugby-transtasman”,”parent_slug”:”super-rugby-transtasman”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”International Rugby”,”slug”:”international-rugby”,”parent_slug”:”international-rugby”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[“logs”]},{“name”:”Rugby World Cup”,”slug”:”rugby-world-cup”,”parent_slug”:”rugby-world-cup”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[“point-scorers”]},{“name”:”Sevens 2019/20″,”slug”:”sevens”,”parent_slug”:”sevens”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Rugby Championship”,”slug”:”rugby-championship”,”parent_slug”:”rugby-championship”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Six Nations”,”slug”:”six-nations”,”parent_slug”:”six-nations”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]}]},{“group_name”:”Regional”,”topics”:[{“name”:”Mitre 10 Cup”,”slug”:”new-zealand”,”parent_slug”:”new-zealand”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Aotearoa”,”slug”:”aotearoa”,”parent_slug”:”aotearoa”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]},{“name”:”Australian Domestic”,”slug”:”ausdomestic”,”parent_slug”:”ausdomestic”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]}]},{“group_name”:null,”topics”:[{“name”:”Autumn Nations Cup”,”slug”:”autumn-nations-cup”,”parent_slug”:”autumn-nations-cup”,”uri”:null,”hidden_tabs”:[]}]}],”featured”:{“topics”:[{“name”:”Springboks”,”slug”:”springboks”,”parent_slug”:”springboks”,”uri”:null},{“name”:”B&I Lions”,”slug”:”british-lions”,”parent_slug”:”british-lions”,”uri”:null},{“name”:”Carling Currie Cup”,”slug”:”currie-cup”,”parent_slug”:”currie-cup”,”uri”:null}]}}

Source link

Continue Reading

World Cup

Women’s 7s tournament in Tokyo was the best showcase of what rugby is – Planet Sevens

Published

on

Generally speaking, I think the women’s rugby sevens at the Olympic Games was a very good tournament, with interesting matches.

I was surprised that in a number of cases, after such a complicated year because of the pandemic and lack of competition, we saw so many good games and a lovely tournament which was very positive for rugby, spectators and those of us who love the game.

Every year, the standard rises.

You notice how professional the game has become, especially in rugby sevens. You notice that the new players arrive with little experience but a very good standard and are capable of playing good rugby.

After one or two seasons on the World Rugby Sevens Series you start to carry a bag full of knowledge for sevens; yet, as I say, the younger players are very ready and are constantly evolving, which in turn means the standard rises.

It would be unfair to highlight a specific player; there were obviously some outstanding performances but in a team sport full of excellence, I wouldn’t want to name one.

There were a few teams that shone, from China, who had a very good tournament, Great Britain surprised us with their standard despite the huge challenges they faced in preparation, or Fiji who came through to win Olympic bronze.

This is Fiji’s third Olympic medal – after the two from the men’s sevens – and it makes me very happy because they are very good players and are playing very well. This bronze medal is a great feat for the country. I am delighted for them.

France was already playing very well and had shown what they were capable of in reaching the final of Rugby World Cup Sevens in San Francisco three years ago.

Of course, New Zealand was a deserving champion; being one of the favourites, but it was noticeable how hungry they were to get their gold medal.

Congratulations to all!

As much as there were good performances, there were also some very good matches, such as the semi-final between Fiji and New Zealand, decided in sudden death extra-time.

We know this is sevens and that it could have gone either way. Knowing how to compete and manage pressure situations was the difference for the Black Ferns Sevens.

The media exposure that comes with the Olympics offers a window to the world that brings the game closer to those who don’t normally watch rugby or know sevens.

It is super-positive that being an Olympic sport is an attraction for federations, meaning that more boys and girls will want to play a game which they see as interesting. Hopefully, we will grow in numbers and quality in future years.

We are on a good road to Paris 2024 in terms of teams and players; the standard is there and sevens is a good sporting show.

Seeing empty stands made me sad for players involved in something so nice as the Olympic Games.

On the other hand, even if the first feeling was one of sadness, I also had to say to myself: “At least they managed to enjoy it.”

All of this was impossible a year ago, so the positive thing is that it has gone ahead and at the end of the day, that is great.

My most sincere congratulations to every team. I know they’ve gone through some hard times in the past few months, it has been an honour to have been so well represented by them.

Source link

Continue Reading

World Cup

Disappointment for York as Rugby League World Cup set to be postponed for a year

Published

on

The Rugby League World Cup Trophies pictured in front of the LNER Community Stadium. Photograph: Will Palmer/SWpix.com

York looks set to have to wait more than a year for World Cup glory.

The 2021 Rugby League World Cup will be postponed until 2022 after embattled officials finally conceded defeat in their bid to stage the tournament as planned in the autumn, the PA news agency is reporting.

Several games were due to be played at the LNER Community Stadium.

Officials initially vowed to press ahead regardless after Australia and New Zealand pulled out, citing safety concerns amid the coronavirus pandemic, and had hoped a direct plea to players would be enough to keep the tournament alive.

However, a statement issued last Friday on behalf of all 16 NRL clubs pledging support for the boycott and calling for a postponement proved to be the last straw.

The PA news agency understands the UK government, which backed the tournament to the tune of £25 million, has agreed that it should be put back 12 months and that recommendation will go before an emergency World Cup board meeting on Wednesday.

An official announcement is expected after that meeting with a press conference set to take place on Thursday morning when chief executive Jon Dutton will front the media.

Due to host semi-finals

Picture by Will Palmer/SWpix.com – 13/07/2021 – RLWC2021 Rugby League World Cup 2021. The Rugby League World Cup Trophies pictured in front of York Minster, York.

York was down to host eight fixtures at the LNER Community Stadium, all in the women’s tournament, starting off with New Zealand vs France. 

The full fixture list for York was: 

  • New Zealand vs France (women’s): Wednesday 10th November – 5pm
  • Australia vs Cook Islands (women’s): Wednesday 10th November – 7.30pm
  • New Zealand vs Cook Islands (women’s): Sunday 14th November – 5pm
  • Australia vs France (women’s): Sunday 14th November – 7.30pm
  • France vs Cook Islands (women’s): Thursday 18th November – 5pm
  • Australia vs New Zealand (women’s): Thursday 18th November – 7.30pm
  • Women’s Semi-Final (teams TBC): Monday 22nd November – 5pm
  • Women’s Semi-Final (teams TBC): Monday 22nd November – 7.30pm

York was also the team training base for New Zealand’s men and women’s team, as well as the women’s sides from Australia, France and Cook Islands.

But all that was thrown into turmoil after both the Australian and New Zealand Rugby Leagues announced their intention to boycott the tournament due to health concerns.

Among the partners who had been working with the Rugby League World Cup team to bring the event to York were City of York Council, York City Knights, Make It York, GLL, York St John University, University of York and Queen Ethelberga’s. 

The postponement means the hard work will now begin again for officials, who will need to find extra funding to keep the World Cup operation in place for another 12 months. Extra staff were taken on on 12-month contracts which are due to expire at the end of November.

Officials will have to start fresh negotiations with the BBC, who were due to show all 61 matches across the men’s, women’s and wheelchair events, as well as with stadium and camp hosts.

They must also agree on a new timetable, with officials likely to want to avoid a clash with the FIFA World Cup in Qatar from November 21 to December 18.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending