Connect with us

USA Rugby

Today’s players reflect on women’s rugby pioneers | Rugby World Cup 2021

Published

on

We use cookies to help make our sites function properly. We would also like to use cookies to continually improve our sites, offer you a better experience and deliver personalised content to you. Our use of cookies is described further in our Cookies Policy.

You can enable all optional cookies by clicking “Accept All Cookies”. You can also choose to adjust your cookie settings and select to have only necessary cookies and the cookies you wish to be deployed to be used.

Using this tool will set a cookie on your device to remember your preferences.

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

USA Rugby

Seaside rugby player prepares for Tokyo Olympics

Published

on

U.S. rugby player and Seaside High School graduate Matai Leuta has arrived in Japan ahead of the Tokyo Olympics.Leuta was born in Salinas but spent 10 years of his childhood in Fiji. There, he developed a love for rugby and the dream of becoming a professional player. “It is a very popular sport on the island. Every kid fantasizes about growing up and being a professional rugby player. That was instilled in me very early,” Leuta said.When Leuta was 16, he and his family returned to the Central Coast. He played at Seaside High School and graduated in 2008.On the Central Coast, Leuta continued playing club rugby while holding a full-time job. In 2015, a friend reached out to him and changed everything. “I was working at the Marriott in downtown Monterey and a friend of mine sent me a link about a tryout down here in San Diego with the national team,” Leuta said.Leuta jumped at the opportunity, traveling to southern California and gaining the attention of national scouts. He was invited to the USA Men’s Falcons squad and made his debut during the 2014-15 HSBC Sevens Series at the Hong Kong Sevens tournament.Now, Leuta is an Olympian. He has been named to the U.S. Men’s Sevens team for the Tokyo Olympics. “I am really humbled and excited at the same time to represent, not just my family, but this country and hopefully I can perform to the best of my ability,” he said.Team USA will play their first match on July 26 against Kenya.

U.S. rugby player and Seaside High School graduate Matai Leuta has arrived in Japan ahead of the Tokyo Olympics.

Leuta was born in Salinas but spent 10 years of his childhood in Fiji. There, he developed a love for rugby and the dream of becoming a professional player.

“It is a very popular sport on the island. Every kid fantasizes about growing up and being a professional rugby player. That was instilled in me very early,” Leuta said.

When Leuta was 16, he and his family returned to the Central Coast. He played at Seaside High School and graduated in 2008.

On the Central Coast, Leuta continued playing club rugby while holding a full-time job. In 2015, a friend reached out to him and changed everything.

“I was working at the Marriott in downtown Monterey and a friend of mine sent me a link about a tryout down here in San Diego with the national team,” Leuta said.

Leuta jumped at the opportunity, traveling to southern California and gaining the attention of national scouts. He was invited to the USA Men’s Falcons squad and made his debut during the 2014-15 HSBC Sevens Series at the Hong Kong Sevens tournament.

Now, Leuta is an Olympian. He has been named to the U.S. Men’s Sevens team for the Tokyo Olympics.

“I am really humbled and excited at the same time to represent, not just my family, but this country and hopefully I can perform to the best of my ability,” he said.

Team USA will play their first match on July 26 against Kenya.

Source link

Continue Reading

USA Rugby

He once starred in the SDSU backfield. Now he’s working to keep his NFL dream alive

Published

on

SAN DIEGO – Juwan Washington had quite a bit of success with his former team. Racking up numerous accolades in his four years in the backfield at San Diego State, the now 24-year-old hopes to remind NFL scouts of that college player.

Washington missed the opportunity to attend any pro days due to the pandemic, unable to prove to scouts that a previous ankle injury had healed.

“I talked to the trainers for the (Houston) Texans, so they wanted me to come in and get looked at but that didn’t happen with the Pro Day stuff getting canceled,” Washington said.

Months later, Washington thought he had a solid opportunity with the Montreal Alouettes of the CFL. But it didn’t last for long. He got cut a couple weeks ago.

“It motivated me a lot,” he said. “I just started working even harder just to get a chance.”

Could a third time be the charm? He has yet another opportunity this weekend to show off his talent at a HUB Football camp at Helix Charter High School in La Mesa, where he’ll work out in front of NFL, CFL, USFL and USA Rugby scouts.

Washington joins four other former Aztecs at the camp this weekend, including cornerback Kyree Woods, tackle Ryan Pope, defensive end Myles Cheatham and linebacker Kyahva Tezino.

“I’m super excited just to go out there and show what I can do in person,” Washington said. “I know there’ll be a few scouts there from East League and stuff, so if they can just see me in person and just compare it to the film that I have from college.”

Washington trains five to six days a week, coming to places like Werk Fitness in La Mesa. That’s where he and his childhood friend and trainer, Landon Beamon, put in the work.

“Juwan, he’s a beast,” Beamon said. “Every time he comes here, he gives his all. He gives his all, so I’ve seen a lot of progress from him. He’s just more explosive. His knee’s looking good, over strength.”

When he’s not with Beamon, Washington works out with old teammates looking for their own shot, too.

“I’m still the same person from the film in college,” Washington said. “I just want to remind them that I’m still the same guy that ran for almost a thousand yards. I was one yard away.”

“He has God with him, so he’s going to be okay,” Beamon said. “He’s going to beast it. He’s going to beast out.”

Source link

Continue Reading

USA Rugby

After 36 Hours of Travel, Eagle Men Arrive in Japan With a Job To Do

Published

on

Traveling to Japan was a big long slog for the USA 7s teams getting ready for the Olympics, but they’ve made it.

The trip from San Diego to LA to Seoul (where they took COVID tests) to Tokyo and then on the Mimasaka took 36 hours. Grueling, for sure, but worth it.

A Warm Welcome

“Considering everything, it actually went quite smoothly,” said Brett Thompson. “I’m sure it was a logistical nightmare, but we got here and our training pitch is beautiful and our gym is perfect—we couldn’t ask for more.”

As captain Madison Hughes was keeping an eye on the team and how they were feeling, and he was happy with what he saw.

“The guys did a really good job of focusing on what we could control during the travel,” he said. “They stayed positive throughout and now it’s about getting dialed in and used to the local time zone and climate.”

“A lot of it was sitting around waiting for tests to come back,” added Danny Barrett. The COVID tests all came back negative and so they moved on to the next thing. Having heard the horror stories, such as South Africa having to go into quarantine because someone not on the team, but who was on their flight, tested positive, they were grateful to get the all-clear.

“We’ve been under pretty strict orders to make sure we’re doing everything in our power to be able to compete,” said Barrett. “Once we got on the ground it’s business as usual. Get in the gym, ride the bike a little bit, lift a bit of weight; get out on the field kind of get moving again, get a ball back in your hands.”

The biggest worry? Food. Would the food be what they’re used to. This topic has cropped up now and then with the team, as nutrition is a big part of their training, and if it gets changed up sometimes that throws off the players. All good in Mimasaka, where the players had only praise for the USOPC staff and their hotel staff for making their stay easy.

So Who Are They Worried About?

Worried? No one. Focused on? Well, there’s that first game.

“Kenya,” said Hughes. “The first game is the big one for me. That’s where it went wrong for us in Rio. We can’t really overlook that first one because if we don’t get the job done there, it becomes pretty difficult.”

We’re taking it like any tournament

And although there’s been no World Series for over a year, there have been 7s tournaments, and, Barrett pointed out, “we saw Ireland in the UK, we saw Kenya out in Spain, and those are two important games. We’ll worry about South Africa once we get through Kenya and Ireland. We are focusing on them and what they do and what we can do to counteract, but we’re also focusing on ourselves—what do we need to work on, what do we need to freshen up, what do we need to continue to get batter at, and what do we need to hone in our skills.”

Hughes agreed.

“We believe when we focus on ourselves and we’re performing at the top of our game and doing what we need to do we can perform with anyone.”

USA Men’s Olympic 7s Schedule:

See NBC Schedule here>>

Day One
USA vs Kenya —Eastern Time 10:30pm July 25
USA vs Ireland—Eastern Time 5:30am July 26

Day Two
USA vs South Africa — Eastern Time 10:30pm July 26
Knockout Rounds begin at 5:00am Eastern Time

Day Three
Medal Rounds

 



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending